Lego och förpackningarna igen

Minns ni mitt inlägg om Legos förpackningar? Jag klagade på mycket luft i Legos förpackningar, och Lego svarade något märkligt formulerat som i alla fall definitivt måste tolkas som att de inte tyckte att det fanns något som behövde åtgärdas.

Men nu läser jag följande på sidan 20 i Legos Progress Report för 2011:

Smaller boxes meet consumer needs and save CO2 and waste

The Green Box project started as a project to reduce the size of LEGO® boxes to meet demands from retailers and consumers who wanted less packaging material. With it comes the potential to save over 1,000 tonnes of carbon emissions from packaging and over 2,500 tonnes of cardboard waste once it has been fully implemented in 2013.

Throughout 2011, the LEGO Group has been working to develop and test the Green Box project in order to be able to fully implement it globally in 2013. The project focuses on reducing the size of boxes, but as the project developed it became clear that there were obvious environmental benefits too.

Preliminary trials indicate that this project could help save around 1,000 tonnes on carbon emissions from packaging material and over 2,500 tonnes post-consumer waste.

– We can see that by taking box sizes down, we save significantly on volume. This has a positive impact on how much paper we have to buy for packing material, on how many boxes we can stack on pallets and finally, on how many products we can pack in trucks when we distribute, says Carsten Rasmussen, Senior Vice President and General Manager, EU Production.

Calculations of the total carbon emissions regarding the total lifecycle of the packaging materials indicate that the carbon footprint of the packaging materials will be reduced.

As the boxes are smaller, more can be filled into trucks distributing LEGO® products, which in turn means fewer trucks on the roads.

– We have 40,000 product movements every day globally, and with the smaller boxes we can move more with fewer trucks, says Carsten Rasmussen.

In order to improve packaging even more, Carsten Rasmussen and his team are currently testing the plastic bags containing bricks inside the box, known as pre-packs. The tests are looking for ways to reduce the amount of air in the prepack bags, while keeping up the high requirements for product safety.

Less packaging material = less waste

By reducing the amount of packaging material, the amount of post-consumer waste will also be reduced.

– We are extremely happy with these positive effects on our environmental impact. Combined with the fact that we will now also start using FSC-certified material for all wood-based packaging and print, we see this project as a great leap towards creating a positive impact for the future, says Jes Faltum, Director, Sustainability Development, Corporate Affairs.

Den här texten ger ett helt annat intryck än det svar jag fick per mejl. Jag vet int jag, men jag tycker att om man nu faktiskt jobbar med frågan och tycker den är viktig så kan det vara en poäng med att också förmedla detta engagemang till de kunder som faktiskt hör av sig och frågar…?

Smaller boxes meet consumer needs and save CO2 and waste

The Green Box project started as a project to reduce the size of LEGO® boxes to meet demands from retailers and consumers who wanted less packaging material. With it comes the potential to save over 1,000 tonnes of carbon emissions from packaging and over 2,500 tonnes of cardboard waste once it has been fully implemented in 2013.

Throughout 2011, the LEGO Group has been working to develop and test the Green Box project in order to be able to fully implement it globally in 2013. The project focuses on reducing the size of boxes, but as the project developed it became clear that there were obvious environmental benefits too.

Preliminary trials in dicate that this project could help save around 1,000 tonnes on carbon emissions from packag ing material and over 2,500 tonnes post-con sumer waste.

– We can see that by taking box sizes down, we save significantly on volume. This has a positive impact on how much paper we have to buy for packing material, on how many boxes we can stack on pallets and finally, on how many products we can pack in trucks when we distribute, says Carsten Rasmussen, Senior Vice President and General Manager, EU Production.

Calculations of the total carbon emissions regarding the total lifecycle of the packaging materials indicate that the carbon footprint of the packaging mate rials will be reduced.

As the boxes are smaller, more can be filled into trucks distributing LEGO® products, which in turn means fewer trucks on the roads.

– We have 40,000 product movements every day globally, and with the smaller boxes we can move more with fewer trucks, says Carsten Rasmussen.

In order to improve packaging even more, Carsten Rasmussen and his team are currently testing the plastic bags containing bricks inside the box, known as pre-packs. The tests are looking for ways to reduce the amount of air in the prepack bags, while keeping up the high requirements for product safety.

Less packaging material = less waste

By reducing the amount of packaging material, the amount of post-consumer waste will also be reduced.

– We are extremely happy with these positive effects on our environmental impact. Combined with the fact that we will now also start using FSC-certified material for all wood-based packaging and print, we see this project as a great leap towards creating a positive impact for the future, says Jes Faltum, Drector, Sustainability Development, Corporate Affairs.

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